This sport was given less attention than trapshooting but it evolved in an interesting, if unspectacular, manner to its present well-equipped four layout facility. The following chronological presentation of notes taken from the archives present the skeet shooting story.

In May 1932, approval was given for the purchase and installation (not to exceed $50) of “a” skeet trap. In May 1934, a “field” was approved, noting that 4 boys would be required to operate same. In December of that year, 175 targets were thrown.

In 1935, St. Catharines’ shooters were invited to shoot skeet and, in 1936, skeet shooting was considered low when taking the investment into account.

In December 1937 and for the first time, skeet practice targets thrown exceeded trap targets thrown – and in June 1938, there was almost as much skeet practice as trap practice. In the same year, a $65. skeet gun ($40 donated) was top price in a handicap skeet event. That year the Crang Trophy shoot, to be held at the York Skeet Club (Toronto) was mentioned. At the end of the year, it was decided to put the traps in shape and install a pull-house with a budget of $25. the actual cost was $85..

In response to an enquiry from the York Skeet Club in January 1939, the club favored the formation of a skeet league. A second skeet field was approved with a budget of $300; the actual cost was $192. A skeet event was added to the Merchandise shoot.

The club affiliated with the OSSA when it was formed in 1940. 4-class Skeet shoots were held in 1947, 1948 and 1949 with 1st and 2nd prizes in each class1 prices varied between 4 ¢  and 5 ¢ per target.

Four Remington traps were purchased in 1947, and 1948 minutes reported that these traps “are now O.K.” In 1947, a member electrified a skeet field without permission and was chastised so he donated the work; the Board refused the donation and paid out $72.

New skeet traps with solenoids were purchased in 1954; the minutes reported low vol tage problems in 1957. In 1967, four fields were operational. Some time later, one field was converted to International skeet operation by a few members but the club did not maintain the layout.

The skeet fields were overhauled in 1974; in 1976, some directors termed the skeet facility “a complete loss”. Lack of cost accounting procedures resulted in guesswork, in actual fact, skeet practice was viable and has produced more revenue than trap practice in recent years.

In 1980 and 1981, successful skeet clinics were held. Early in 1982, the club owns six sets of Western White Flyer Self-loading Electric Traps for its four excellent skeet layouts.

The shell and target prices outlined in the preceding Trapshooting section apply as well to skeet shooting. The club has participated in the Lower Lakes Skeet League for a number of years but there is no reference to a commencement date in the files.